POTD: Ozark Spring

Title and Location

Ozark Spring

Location: Long Pool Falls, Ozark National Forest
Camera: Phase One P45, Cambo RS, Schneider 35XL
Settings: f/16, 5 sec, ISO 100
When: May 2010

I had been to Long Pool Falls on at least four occasions before “Ozark Spring” was photographed.  It’s watershed is relatively small and it takes a fair amount of rain to get it running well.

It is very typical of waterfalls in the Ozark Mountains near my home.  Most of them only run during wet weather.   When it is wet, the Ozarks are full of literally thousands of waterfalls.  Many just as beautiful as long pool falls.
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POTD: Tenacity

Title and Location

Tenacity

Location: Escalante National Monument, Utah
Camera: Mamiya 645d, Phase One P30+, 28mm
Settings: ISO 100, f/16, 1/8 sec
When: March 2008

This cottonwood tree picked a difficult place to survive.  Each year into the drought it struggled losing more and more green.  Even so, it still hangs on.

Photographing this scene inspired me to never give up.  Success doesn’t require luck or even skill in most cases.  With the “Tenacity” to just keep trying you can accomplish almost any goal.

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POTD: Smith Creek

Title and Location

Smith Creek

Location: Smith Creek Nature Preserve, Arkansas
Camera: Phase One P45, Cambo RS, Schneider 70L
Settings: f/11, ISO 50, 5 sec
When: May 2010

Smith Creek located just south of Boxley Valley was preserved by The Nature Conservancy to protect critical Indiana bat habitat.  The side-effect was they also gave us one of the most intimately beautiful areas in Arkansas.

On a rainy day in May, you can spend the whole day photographing this small area.  The further upstream you hike the more beautiful it becomes.

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POTD: Fishing on the Edge

Title and Location

Fishing on the Edge

Location: Cape Hatteras National Seashore
Camera: Phase One P30+, Mamiya 645D, 55-110mm
Settings: f/11, ISO 400, 1/125 sec
When: November 2011

Cape Hatteras is the most easterly portion of the eastern seaboard.   This location is unique in that storm currents from the north naturally flow in a southerly direction while storm currents from the south flow in a northerly direction.  These storm currents collide off the coast of Hatteras Island.  Fish get carried along by the currents as well which makes for great fishing.

The fishermen were congregated at the point where the waters collide.  I took several photographs and stitched them into a unique panoramic image of fisherman, choppy waters and stormy skies.

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POTD: Gil’s Barn

Gil's Barn, Palouse region of Southeast Washington

Gil’s Barn

Location: Palouse Region of Southeast Washington
Camera: Phase One P30+, Mamiya 645D, 55-110mm
Settings: UNKNOWN
When: June 5, 2010

The Palouse Region is a glacial morraine win Southeastern Washington State. It’s rolling hills and rich soil make it both the bread basket of the US and a photographers paradise. Each Spring the fields are a velvety spread of green that covers nearly 3500 square miles. Having been farmed for generations the fields are home to hundreds of photogenic old barns.

I named this Gil’s barn after an Arkansas farmer who allowed me to photograph on his property when I first started in photography.

The photograph is made up of six different exposures combined using special software to create a wider angle view of the scene.

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POTD: Valley Sentinel

Valley Sentinel, Mt Magazine SP, Arkansas
Valley Sentinel

Location: Mt. Magazine State Park, Arkansas
Camera: Phase One P65+, Cambo RS, Schneider 24XL
Settings: f/16, ISO 50, 24 seconds
When: November 5th 2010, 6:15pm

This view is perhaps the most stunning vista in all of the mid-western states.  A nearly 800 year old cedar tree overlooks Blue Mountain Lake in the Petit Jean River Valley.  In the distance you see at least 50 miles into the Ouachita Mountains.

I had already photographed a vertical panorama of this tree well before sunset when the sun dipped below storm clouds on the horizon. Thinking the show was over I packed up my gear and was enjoying the view as the light faded.

Shortly after sunset the horizon began to glow. I scrambled to setup my gear and had time for a single exposure of nearly a half-minute. This image is still my favorite and I will never forget the last minute gift of this scene. The wide angle lens allowed me to capture the transition of day to night in a single exposure.

Technical camera wide angle lens naturally darken at the edges making a wonderful vignette highlighting this incredible scene and saved the sky from being too bright at the horizon.

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