POTD: Forgotten

Title and Location

Forgotten

Location: Somewhere in Missouri
Camera: Phase One P65+, Cambo RS, Rodenstock HR32
Settings: f/16, ISO 50, 2.5 sec
When: Winter 2011

The job of a nature photographer is combining subject, light and weather into a 2-dimensional scene the expresses a mood or tells a story.  While I enjoy photographing scenes that tell a happy story or brighten spirits, some of my most rewarding images are those that evoke an emotion in the viewer.  “Forgotten” is a special image that folks in my part of the country really relate to.

Almost every person native to the midwest either lived or had a relative who lived on a small farm. A simple lifestyle of hard work, home cooked meals and family was predominate not that many years ago.  Unfortunately, this style of living has almost disappeared from the fabric of this area but not the good memories.

Faith and I flew past this location on our way home from a failed outing scouting a prairie in southwest Missouri.  The fantastic oak tree caught my eye and I turned the jeep around to investigate.  After scouting a half-dozen compositions I waited an hour or so for the light to become golden then exposed two 3×4 images by shifting the back 15mm from side to side creating this panoramic view of a lifestyle long “Forgotten”.

All my images are available as limited edition artwork. Click here for more information or to purchase a fine art print.

POTD: Au Naturelle

Title and Location

Au Naturelle

Location: White Mountains, California
Camera: Phase One P30+, Mamiya 645D, 28mm
Settings: f/8, ISO 50, 1/80
When: September 2009

Bristlecone pines are nearly 5000 years old and the oldest trees on the planet.  They grow high in the White Mountains at elevations over 10,000 feet.  Strong westerly winds turn these slow growing trees into contortions making them all different.

Recent fires had raged through central California destroying large swathes of land and raced through this ancient forest.  Fortunately the strong winds and sparse groundcover sent the fire through so fast most of the trees were damaged but not killed.  On this tree the bark got so hot it popped off into small pieces of coal at the base.  The raw wood with attractive patterns was left exposed to the elements (and my camera).

As I looked through the viewfinder composing my image I suddenly noticed the shape of a nude female. Nature is full of surprises and I have to tell you I was both amazed and amused as I finished photographing “Au Naturelle”.

This image is one of only a few I sell as “Collector’s Editions”.  This portfolio is artwork so unique the edition size is extremely limited to protect the investment value for collectors.  As each edition is sold the price doubles for the next.

Click here for more information or to purchase a fine art print.