POTD: Watching

Title and Location

Watching

Location: Kebler Pass, Colorado
Camera: Nikon D3, 14-24mm lens
Settings: f/2.8, 24 seconds, ISO 1600
When: October, 2011

It was cloudy when I parked to spend the night in my jeep near Kebler Pass.  If you’ve ever slept in a jeep you know it’s not the most comfortable place to spend the night.  Nature photographers get used to this and you wake up several times during the night to reposition and stop the aching in your back.  I woke at half past three to clear skies and a full moon shining bright.

After a short drive I noticed these aspen trees on the hillside above the road. Pointing the wide angle lens upward drew the tops of the trees together. Normally I would correct this but it seemed as if the trees where joining together to enjoy the starry sky.

All my images are available as limited edition artwork. Click here for more information or to purchase a fine art print.

POTD: Maroon Bells

Title and Location

Maroon Bells

Location: Aspen, Colorado
Camera: Phase One P45, Schneider 72L Lens, Cambo Technical Camera
Settings: f/11, 1 sec, ISO 100
When: Unknown

I’m back after a short break, I hope you enjoy today’s image of the day.  Located outside of Aspen, Colorado these majestic mountains received their name for their maroon-colored bell shape. Maroon Lake in the foreground mirrors the foothills making it one of the most picturesque and photographed mountains in the country.

All my images are available as limited edition artwork. Click here for more information or to purchase a fine art print.

POTD: Gil’s Barn

Gil's Barn, Palouse region of Southeast Washington

Gil’s Barn

Location: Palouse Region of Southeast Washington
Camera: Phase One P30+, Mamiya 645D, 55-110mm
Settings: UNKNOWN
When: June 5, 2010

The Palouse Region is a glacial morraine win Southeastern Washington State. It’s rolling hills and rich soil make it both the bread basket of the US and a photographers paradise. Each Spring the fields are a velvety spread of green that covers nearly 3500 square miles. Having been farmed for generations the fields are home to hundreds of photogenic old barns.

I named this Gil’s barn after an Arkansas farmer who allowed me to photograph on his property when I first started in photography.

The photograph is made up of six different exposures combined using special software to create a wider angle view of the scene.

Click here for more information or to purchase a fine art print.